Past Features

November 14, 2012

Drones Alone?
Are we really that stupid?
Glenn Spencer, American Border Patrol -- November 14, 2014   
    According to the Associated Press (better known as the Administration's Press):
AP Exclusive: Drones Patrol Half of Mexico Border
The U.S. government now patrols nearly half the Mexican border by drones alone in a largely unheralded shift to control desolate stretches where there are no agents, camera towers, ground sensors or fences, and it plans to expand the strategy to the Canadian border. [...] --- Under the new approach, Predator Bs sweep remote mountains, canyons and rivers with a high-resolution video camera and return within three days for another video in the same spot, according to two officials with direct knowledge of the effort on condition of anonymity because details have not been made public.
    It is simply impossible for the Predator B to reliably detect human beings using this method. And, if they did detect something suspicious after hours of analysis, and how long would it take a US Border Patrol agent to reach that spot?
    And the AP reports, “About 4 percent of missions have been false alarms…” Yet, another source reports that: “Only 2 percent of the drone missions did offer evidence of unauthorized border crossings…” -- In other words, twice as many missions reported bad information than those that reported useful information.
    AP quotes House Homeland Security Chairman McCaul: “We can no longer focus only on static defenses such as fences and fixed (camera) towers,” he said. This is same McCaul who recently said we need to rely on Aerostat blimps. -- The idea that people like Chairman McCaul could be hoodwinked by this nonsense is disturbing, but we already had our doubts about him.
   This is an “exclusive” - no doubt because someone in DHS called in the AP lapdogs and spoon-fed them this story to make it sound palatable.
    America, are we really that stupid?
  
  PS: The Sonic Barrier could to the job right at a fraction of the cost of the Predator B.

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